Families

Hearing Can Have A Happy Thanksgiving

English: Oven roasted turkey, common fare for ...

English: Oven roasted turkey, common fare for Christmas and Thanksgiving celebrations. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hello

Here’s a quick list of how to help yourself enjoy the festivities.  You’ll be under pressure with presents and festivities and meals.

1.  None of us are perfect.  If you’ve forgotten something, it doesn’t matter.  Families dine off what happened Thanksgiving ten years ago in my friend’s house when her husband insisted on doing something and then forgot.  They all sat down and fell about laughing.  She said it was the best Thanksgiving ever.

2. Sit against a wall.  It absorbs the background noise that you don’t want.

3. Tablecloths absorb noise from knives and forks.   If don’t want that, table runners help and anything soft will absorb the clatter.

4.  Do you have a listener for TV?  Take an extension plug with you if you’re going out.  TV’s have 2/3 sockets for other things like DVD, CD etc.  Take your own so that everyone else can relax.  It makes you an easy guest to be invited back!

5.Yesterday someone introduced me as ‘deaf’.  I hit the roof, non-verbally.  Okay, so I glared at him as he’s my Aston-Patterning instructor and knows it’s a hearing issue.  Okay, so sometimes I do my own thing when I’m not paying attention but he knows me.  Those who don’t, will look at me in amazement when I do look up but he’s quick to say that everyone moves differently.  Then we all grin.  Other people’s perception is a reason for that e- book coming out shortly.  The rest of the world doesn’t understand hearing so he was using a word other people relate to.   It’s up to us to tellt hem like it is.  It’s like wearing glasses.  Do tehy walk around saying they’re sight-impaired or blind?  Neither, it’s accepted and festivities are a time when you can gently explain.

6.  Likewise if you’re family, friends or partner of someone with a hearing device, look at them when you speak.   Don’t talk with your back to them and if you’re in another room and want a response, get over it.  You are talking to yourself!

7.  Lights – it’s not the Blair Witch Project.   We need to see you but it doesn’t have to be bright.

8.  People who sit against a window will have their faces in shadow.   It’s hard to lip-read but with anyone you know well, you’ll be fine.  You’re attuned to their voice and the way they talk.  If you need them to slow down, tell them. They’ll be so pleased that you wan to listen to what they have to say.

9.  Follow the example of small children.  They know exactly how to communicate.

10. Most of all, have fun!

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Debbie Jeffrey

‘Join That Conversation!’

www.hearingwellbeing.com

www.debbiejeffreybooks.com

 

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