Balloon Tower Farnborough, Hampshire UK (Copyright to Hearing Wellbei ng 2012)

What the eye doesn’t see, this heart grieves over

Hello Everyone

Most women like looking at websites that sell houses.  It is not because we will buy one; we’re just looking.  Recently, I saw a lot of televisions and it suddenly came to me that people with ordinary hearing were having problems seeing and hearing.  The bigger the   TV, flatscreen,  Blu-ray, sting ray 😉 the bigger the problem.   The industry has a constant struggle to keep up with making all of the dots (pixels?) on the screen clear.

Clarity!  People with ordinary hearing are having the same problem as hearing-assisted people.  Why?  Because all of the TV’s, especially the bigger ones, were placed against the window.  It makes sense; people still want their pictures on the wall, so the only other free space is the window.

They don’t understand why suddenly they can’t see or hear as well.  It must be the TV.  Send it back.  Get a bigger one with more dots per square cm.  I know the dot idea has gone out of fashion but it doesn’t matter what TV Design Engineers create.  The problem will always be the same.

Basically, an object against a window will immediately put the front of it into shadow.

The bigger the object, the more shadow you get.  Housewives don’t like it, as it blocks the light.  Anyone watching it will turn the picture clarity up full and the sound up full.  Since they don’t think they have to do that with a new TV, they get irritated and send it back or complain to the manufacturer.  The latter refers back to the Design Engineer, saying it must be the fault of the design.

At this point, you’d think that the Design Engineers would start asking questions about how the product was being used.  They have the technical details.  The TV’s operate perfectly under their design criteria.  The Design Engineer creates questions for the public.  This is like Chinese whispers.  By the time the question is printed on card for the customer, the Marketing Department has made it more exciting and shiny, with colours.  When the Design Engineer sees it, there are sounds of breaking cups and something unyielding being kicked with smothered curses.

The only way the Engineers find out how the product is working, is by conducting their own unscientific surveys, usually amongst friends.  This shows the importance of dinner parties.  Someone is bound to complain to him, probably a wife complaining of lack of light.  Then her husband will pitch in about actors mumbling.  It is nothing of the sort.  If you’ve read this blog often, then you know my thoughts on lip-reading and casting faces into shadow.  You must see to read, books, faces, expressions.

If the is hung on a wall, think about your neck.  It should be level with the TV both on a monitor and a TV.

Ears act in conjunction with the other senses.  When seeing clearly becomes a problem, what do you think it is like for those of us who lip-read?

Feel free to comment.  These words are merely an opinion.  You can disagree if you like!

Have a great investigating week,

Debbie Jeffrey

Hearing Wellbeing

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Families

Hearing Can Have A Happy Thanksgiving

English: Oven roasted turkey, common fare for ...

English: Oven roasted turkey, common fare for Christmas and Thanksgiving celebrations. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hello

Here’s a quick list of how to help yourself enjoy the festivities.  You’ll be under pressure with presents and festivities and meals.

1.  None of us are perfect.  If you’ve forgotten something, it doesn’t matter.  Families dine off what happened Thanksgiving ten years ago in my friend’s house when her husband insisted on doing something and then forgot.  They all sat down and fell about laughing.  She said it was the best Thanksgiving ever.

2. Sit against a wall.  It absorbs the background noise that you don’t want.

3. Tablecloths absorb noise from knives and forks.   If don’t want that, table runners help and anything soft will absorb the clatter.

4.  Do you have a listener for TV?  Take an extension plug with you if you’re going out.  TV’s have 2/3 sockets for other things like DVD, CD etc.  Take your own so that everyone else can relax.  It makes you an easy guest to be invited back!

5.Yesterday someone introduced me as ‘deaf’.  I hit the roof, non-verbally.  Okay, so I glared at him as he’s my Aston-Patterning instructor and knows it’s a hearing issue.  Okay, so sometimes I do my own thing when I’m not paying attention but he knows me.  Those who don’t, will look at me in amazement when I do look up but he’s quick to say that everyone moves differently.  Then we all grin.  Other people’s perception is a reason for that e- book coming out shortly.  The rest of the world doesn’t understand hearing so he was using a word other people relate to.   It’s up to us to tellt hem like it is.  It’s like wearing glasses.  Do tehy walk around saying they’re sight-impaired or blind?  Neither, it’s accepted and festivities are a time when you can gently explain.

6.  Likewise if you’re family, friends or partner of someone with a hearing device, look at them when you speak.   Don’t talk with your back to them and if you’re in another room and want a response, get over it.  You are talking to yourself!

7.  Lights – it’s not the Blair Witch Project.   We need to see you but it doesn’t have to be bright.

8.  People who sit against a window will have their faces in shadow.   It’s hard to lip-read but with anyone you know well, you’ll be fine.  You’re attuned to their voice and the way they talk.  If you need them to slow down, tell them. They’ll be so pleased that you wan to listen to what they have to say.

9.  Follow the example of small children.  They know exactly how to communicate.

10. Most of all, have fun!

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Debbie Jeffrey

‘Join That Conversation!’

www.hearingwellbeing.com

www.debbiejeffreybooks.com